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Food Poverty Among Irish School Children

Creator:

Molcho, M., Walsh, K., and Nic Gabhainn, S., Centre for Health Promotion Studies, NUI Galway

Subject Keywords: ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION, FOOD, FOOD ACCESS, FOOD POVERTY, SMOKING
Set: Cardiovascular Health (Draft)
Chronic Conditions
Conditions
Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)
Hypertension
Stroke
Obesity
Type: Report
Region: All-island
Description:

The Health Behaviour in Schoolaged Children (HBSC) is a research study conducted by an international network of research teams in collaboration with the World Health Organisation (Europe) and co-ordinated by Professor Candace Currie of the University of Edinburgh. In 2006 HBSC Ireland surveyed 10,334 schoolchildren in Ireland from randomly selected schools HBSC Ireland has found that 16.1% of Irish children report that they go to school or to bed hungry, because there is not enough food at home. The figures are slightly higher among boys (18.7%) compared with girls (14.2%), but relatively stable across all age groups (16.5% among 10-11 years old, 16.4% among 12-14 years and 15.3% among 15-17 years old). A small decrease was found across age groups among boys (from 19.3% among 12-14 years old to 16.8% among 15-17 years old). Children who report going hungry are less likely to: report excellent health and feel happy, while they are more likely to: report frequent physical and emotional symptoms, have been really drunk, smoke, have been injured and have bullied others. Going hungry in this factsheet refers to children who report going hungry to school or to bed sometimes or more, because there is not enough food at home.

Date:

01/01/2006

Rights: © Centre for Health Promotion Studies, NUI Galway
Suggested citation:

Molcho, M., Walsh, K., and Nic Gabhainn, S., Centre for Health Promotion Studies, NUI Galway. (2006) Food Poverty Among Irish School Children [Online]. Available from: http://www.thehealthwell.info/node/3909 [Accessed: 21st May 2018].

  

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